Day of Wrath Judgment Part 1

December 8, 2014

Proper 28A 2014

 

Children’s Sermon

6So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake…

 

Bathrobe and slippers on under alb.

Notice anything different about my outfit today???

 

I am following St. Paul’s advice in the second lesson:

“6So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake…”

I’m thinking we must be having a slumber party at church today!

Do you think that’s what St. Paul means?

 

Now concerning the times and the seasons, brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anything written to you. 2For you yourselves know very well that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night.

 

What’s the day of the Lord?

It’s the day when Jesus will come back, to make all things right in the world.

Some people call it ‘the second coming’ of Christ—the first being when he was born as a baby.

 

But why should we stay awake?  What does that mean?  (be ready)

How can we get ready?

St. Paul goes on to say that we should “put on the breastplate of faith and love,

and a helmet the hope of salvation.”

 

Luckily, I have some of those!  (put those on)

Now am I ready?

 

OH, I am supposed to live out faith and love, the hope of salvation.  Any ideas on how to do that?

 

Keep looking for hope in the world.  Trust that people will follow along if you reach out in faith and love.

 

You don’t need to stop going to bed to be ready for Jesus.

But we will KEEP AWAKE and keep on putting faith and love and the hope of salvation. 

 

 

Adult sermon

 

In November of 1999, I joined with choirs from other 7 countries around the world

         to sing Hector Berlioz’ Requiem in Dortmund, Germany.

        The community choir in this German city had invited us to commemorate the lives of those lost

 in the world wars of the 20th century and to pray for peace in the 21st.  

 

The Requiem Mass is the mass of the dead,

         and Berlioz’ requires one of the largest musical forces of any orchestral music:

         orchestra, four brass bands seated on the four corners of the stage to simulate the sound of battle,

and a choir of 500 voices. 

 

Part of it’s text, the Dies Ire, comes from our old testament reading today from Zephaniah:

Day of Wrath

Day of Distress and Anguish

Day of Ruin and Devastation

Day of Darkness and gloom

Day of Clouds and Thick Darkness

The musical rendering of this text is terrifying

conjuring up images of final judgment

an epic battle of good verses evil

and the earth swallowing up people into everlasting punishment.

 

In the American choir, we had judgments of our own going on.

        We were all young singers, most were in the Masters of Music program at Yale.

                An elite group—or so we thought.

        The host choir from Dortmund, were middle aged singers, and some not well trained.

It was a community choir after all, not an auditioned choir of soon to be professional musicians.

 

But as the elite musicians that we were, we felt compelled to point out these differences.

        We criticized their strained singing among ourselves

        we complained about the conductor, the seating arrangements,

and how hard it was to hear and see over 500 people.

 

“It is as if a man, going on a journey summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them…

        the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground

 and hid his master’s money.”

 

We were pretty much like that slave—given the opportunity of a lifetime

        to travel, to sing with people from around the world,

        to commemorate the war dead and pray for peace—

and we buried it under our hubris and complaints.

 

But our judgmental exterior began to crack the second day of rehearsals

        The Dortmund choir brought chocolates, and gave them to us as a sign of friendship.

Even though we didn’t speak German, we could tell from their faces what it meant to have us there.

 

At the end of evening rehearsal, the Israeli choir broke into a rousing version of a folksong-

        it was an offering for the group, something from home that they could share.

                Musically it was just a fair performance, but everyone clapped with them and cheered.

                Then the Russians broke into song, then the Japanese

        one after another, these groups just had songs inside that they had memorized and could share—

and my choir of almost professionals had nothing.

We didn’t know anything by heart.

 

“For to all those who have more will be given and they will have an abundance,

 but for those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away.”

 

It occurs to me now, looking back on it, that they may have had less ‘talent,’ as we use the word;

        but they had plenty of talent the way Jesus uses the word.

                A talent was a silver coin, comparable to 15 years worth of wages.

                IF you had that kind of wealth, it was prudent to invest it somewhere.

        These folks had made an investment in us, inviting us all to sing.

 They shared what they had, and it multiplied.

 

The night of the performance came.

        We were in a soccer arena, and several thousand people attended.

                We sang the terrifying Dies Ire

        We sang the bitter Lacrymosa, the tears of sorrow.

And then we sang the Sanctus.

 

Holy Holy Holy is the Lord of Hosts.

Heaven and earth are full of your glory.

 

The words are sung by a tenor soloist

        and the melody is unspeakably beautiful, sweet and tender.

        The choir quietly echoes the tenor over the sustained chords of the strings.

It’s like a ray of sunlight breaking through the clouds.

 

I was caught up in the music like everyone else--

        But  the piece is over 90 minutes long.

        My arms were aching from holding my music for so long.

So during the tenor solo, I quietly began to switch the folder from one arm to another.

 

This turned out to be a bad idea.

        The music in the folder was not fastened in,

        and during the transfer, the music began to slip, and then the whole folder.

                As I felt it slide

                All I could think of how awful it would be to hear the clap of the folder clattering to the floor

                during that tender tenor solo.

        I caught the folder just as it slipped off my arm,

and with a flap-a-flap-a-flap! I clapped it to my side, as everyone around me stared.

 

“As for this worthless slave, throw her into the outer darkness,

where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.”

 

I was mortified.  Completely ashamed.

        Here people had travelled from around the world to sing this piece

                 to pray for peace

        and I ruined the most precious part of the whole work.

I had been ridiculing others only to mess it up myself.

 

After the concert I could not look my choir director in the eye.

        I found my husband, and said, “I can’t believe I did that.”

“Did what?”  he asked.

 

He hadn’t even heard.

Neither had my choir director, or the conductor, or the audience.

 

Day of wrath, day of judgment.

        It can be hard to hear these words from our lessons

        because they so closely resemble the bad news of our world

                You wicked and lazy slave!  sounds like the teacher who puts kids on the bad citizen’s list

                or the abusive parent who calls their child ‘good for nothing.’

                        Investment and return remind us of our financial institutions,

                many of which were bailed out in the Great Recession,

                while small homeowners lost their houses to foreclosure.

        Trumpet blast and battle cry remind us of the wars around our globe,

blood and dung are transmitters of ebola

and ‘the whole earth shall be consumed’ sounds like ecological disaster.

 

How can we hear good news in any of that?

It makes us want to take what little is ours, bury it in the ground, and protect ourselves.

 

And yet I am reminded that prophets always gave their words of judgment in the hope

that the people would turn around.

I am reminded that in Jesus’ parable there were two other slaves

slaves who did not see their master has harsh and punishing

but rather as joyful and generous.

In each case, the slave got what they thought they had coming to them.

 

Christians have long held that at the end of time, when Jesus returns, there would be judgment--

        A final accounting for right and wrong, bringing all things to justice.

                Whether or not we think of Judgment Day, we walk around with guilt and shame for what we have done

                        and what we have left undone.

                Some of it is worth repenting of-- 

        and some demands our immediate attention and action,

or we will not have a planet to give to our grandchildren.

       

But some is simply our projection – 

        Seeing God as critical and judging because we feel guilty

        when the true reality is that God moved on a long time ago from judging us

and sees us now as children, beloved and broken, yet worth entrusting the world to.

 

The Day of the Lord is coming.

        That’s what these final weeks of the church year are about, the coming of Christ.

                How we live our lives matters.

                it affects those around us, people across the globe, and those who come after us.

        But let us not presume that whether we have managed our talents well or buried them in the ground

        is the only thing that matters.

 The Gospel of John says that on the cross, Jesus draws all people to himself.

Why would it be any different on the last day?

 

Is the Day of the Lord a day of wrath, or like joining in singing the Holy Holy Holy?

The jury’s still out, but stay tuned, because we are going to talk more about it again…

next week.

 

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